Op-Ed: Walter Isaacson on U.S. media and public diplomacy

American writer Walter Isaacson, in a Broadcasting Board of Governors conversation about U.S. public diplomacy and news outreach abroad, did not get web and social media coverage from Voice of America. U.S. international media outreach is in a deep crisis...

Popular

The Gorchakov Fund will host an expert discussion about the digital diplomacy phenomenon

The Gorchakov Fund will host expert meeting “Digital diplomacy: Can new technologies completely transform world politics?” Tuesday, April 13 at 4:00-6:00 pm Moscow time New...

Beijing’s “Wolf Warriors” score own goals

When China came for their kimchi, South Koreans knew they had had enough. Over the past several weeks, China’s state-backed Global Times has turned...

I ovo je javna diplomatija ?

Kako je dočekan poziv ministarke ustanovama kulture Ministarka kulture i informisanja Maja Gojković uputila je nedavno poziv ustanovama kulture čiji je osnivač Republika da učine...

The Circuitous Route to Becoming an Ambassador

BOOK EXCERPT The Circuitous Route to Becoming an Ambassador Adventure, service and international cooperation drew me to the Foreign Service. Don’t lose your own ideals on your way to the top. By AMBASSADOR TOM ARMBRUSTER | JANUARY 3, 2021 Ambassador Tom Armbruster's interest in the environment and climate change led him underwater during his tour in the Marsall Islands. Photo by Raycrew Marshall Islands. There are two ways to become an American ambassador. For the first one, you have to be handsomely rich, very well connected politically or capable of raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for a successful presidential candidate. The second route is more circuitous and demanding, but also more fun. It winds through the trails and passageways of the U.S. Foreign Service. To join the Foreign Service, you must be a U.S. citizen, 21 or older, and willing to serve at any of the more than 270 American diplomatic missions around the w..

[WebDebate #46 summary] Unpacking the EU’s digital diplomacy and foreign policy

Foreign policies have for many years served as countries’ compass in their relations with each other. With the fast digitalisation of most sectors of...

Why China’s ‘Wolf Warriors’ Won’t Back Down

China’s “wolf warrior” diplomacy may have backfired in Australia, Canada and most recently France, but in a sign of its hardening attitude toward the...

‘Credentials’ to Her Majesty remotely presented

Credentials are the formal documents signed by their Head of State, confirming that have been chosen for their new role as Ambassador. pic.twitter.com/xWLlTrrW2W— The...

How to Prepare for Life After a Career in Diplomacy

ARGUMENT How to Prepare for Life After a Career in Diplomacy We diplomats often identify with our job, and when we leave, we find ourselves confronting an identity crisis — or even loss of identity. By AMBASSADOR CHARLES RAY | NOVEMBER 29, 2020 As ambassador to Zimbabwe, Charles Ray met with grandmothers running community projects to help pay for their grandchildren’s education in 2012. Photo by U.S. Embassy Harare. An assistant public affairs officer in the United States Army moonlighting as an arts and theater critic for a local newspaper may be a peculiarity, but with proper authorization, I managed to pull it off back in the 1970s, when I was stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C. I also wrote for a state historical society’s publication. One of my crusty old editors advised me to establish a practice of writing at least 1,000 words every day to improve my skills. That habit, which continues to this day, proved essential to a fulfilling post-retirement life decades later. After 20 years..

Popular Articles